Diving into Eddington and its sustainability

Over the years eco-design has become more and more important to me. As a little background, my experience is in the field of sustainability and environmentalism – I love beautiful design which doesn’t cost (us) the earth. I wanted, and want, to live as sustainably as I can and believe that a home, whilst being beautiful designed and cleverly executed can offer sustainability and long term durability too. It goes beyond clothing and what we wear. Though my work has kept me between London and Los Angeles, I am a Cambridge girl, born and bred, and nothing beats leaving the intensity of London (which I do love) to reconnect with the place I grew up and catch up with friends and family.

Athena is the Greek goddess of wisdom and inspiration, and the patron goddess of heroic endeavour. It is also the name for Cambridge’s stunning new lifestyle homes and apartments by Hill. The gorgeous properties are inspired by the city’s historic character and are award-winning designs, forming part of an ambitious project by the University of Cambridge to deliver a new neighbourhood for its city.
Located just 10 minutes by bike from Cambridge’s market square, and close in size to ninety full size football pitches or 150 times the size of Trafalgar Square, Cambridge’s Eddington offers an exciting new place to call home. With a market square acting as the heart of this new neighbourhood, a little discovery trek will take you around the range of retail, leisure and community facilities which include a supermarket, the University of Cambridge Primary School, a community & performing arts centre, and yet to come; independent shops, cafes / restaurants, a hotel and a health centre. I will be the first to admit though, that I didn’t expect to discover sustainability in my hometown as I did at Athena.

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Monkee Genes, A Q&A with the designer behind the phenom

Open your wardrobe and have a riffle around. It’s more thank likely that you will stumble upon a pair of jeans in less than 10 seconds.  With its durability and ease of wear, denim tends to be a staple in the wardrobe of most, and understandably so. If you are on the look-out for comfort wear or evening garments, denim – in all of its guises – is often the go-to.

Day to evening with Monkee Genes denim and Jumper from Beaumont Organic. Photo credit: Abdiwali Samatar

The impact of denim manufacturing on the environment is however, more than a little abysmal. Derived from cotton, denim is a labour-intensive and eco-abusive. At the start of their live, those jeans which finds themselves on the shelves retailing for as little as £4 (!) in a fast-fashion retailer may have passed through the hands of a Bangladesh garment workers earning as little as 23p an hour! As VICE explained, jeans are one of the few items we tend to keep for a long time, but their environmental toll is significant. We use huge amounts of water and chemicals to make them, though steps are now being taken to mitigate the impact. But with 2 billion jeans produced annually worldwide, it’s going to take a large-scale sustained effort to make a meaningful change. Read more…

How to Build An Ethical Capsule Wardrobe

Photo by Shalom Mwenesi on Unsplash

The issue of sustainability has been neglected for a very long time. Exploitation of workers, poor work conditions, minimum wage that doesn’t equal a real living wage are just some of the issues that are just now coming to the fore. Then we face such issues as chemicals that go into processing fabrics and the subsequent pollution and water waste – it takes around 700 gallons of water to produce a single T-shirt, not to mention the chemicals – non-organic cotton alone uses 22.5% of the world’s insecticides and 10% of all pesticides. Then we arrive to the lack of transparency by companies, as most of them don’t disclose where their fabrics come from, and some don’t even know where their garments are assembled.  Finally, there is the waste – did you know that an average person disposes of 81 pounds of clothing annually, and 73 percent of the world’s clothing ends up on landfills? We have many a fashion company to blame for the state of the fashion and our planet, but we also have to take a part of the responsibility. Yes, the garments we throw out usually end up where they do due to poor quality and lack of staying power. Hence, it’s our job to focus on quality, not quantity, shop responsibly so we throw away less and at least minimize our carbon footprint. Now, a capsule wardrobe comes with another set of perks – with a finite number of clothing items that mesh well together, you are able to create endless combinations that will make you look stunning every time. No more experimenting, no more wasting time on coming up with an outfit. There is nothing else left to do but take you on the ultimate guide towards building your own little pile of prized possessions that will stand the test of time, so let’s do this. Read more…

Samata featured in i-D film ‘A Beginner’s Guide To Sustainable Fashion’

With the fashion industry now being named one of the world’s leading polluters, It’s time to take action.

Five young creatives share tips and tricks on how you can enjoy fashion responsibly. Whether you’re buying, maintaining or disposing of clothes, there’s always a more sustainable answer.

Are you ready to make sustainable fashion choices in 2019?

A New Place To Call Home, Revisiting Cambridge

It’s easy to forget how lucky I was to call Cambridge my hometown. Whilst the grandeur of the university’s buildings make Cambridge the envy of many cities around the globe, born and raised in the famous ”boom town for the brainy’ and a ‘honey-coloured hotspot’, I swiftly forgot how stunning it was once I settled into London life for university and after. To the outside ‘world’, Cambridge is known as home to one of best and oldest universities in the world – my father attended Churchill College, hence our own location there for the majority of my childhood and teenage years. One of the UK’s top seats of academia is not only steeped in an impressive heritage but also inherent sustainability.

My home in London provides me with a convenient base to travel and see the world – for work and play, alongside a seat in the UK’s fashion capital, and when I was leaving Cambridge to study my degree in East London, I didn’t have the perspective that Cambridge could be a place to suit my lifestyle now balancing work, life and being a new mother too. I didn’t pay attention to what has now become so obvious to me – my hometown was and is beautiful, and one place in particular really brought this message home, Athena; a unique collection of new homes by Hill, one of the UK’s leading housebuilders. Hill has worked in collaboration with the University of Cambridge on Athena’s design and ethos, to create an important part of Eddington, a sustainable new neighbourhood for Cambridge.

Nearly 10 years ago, Cambridge was described as one of the “most beautiful cities in the world” by Forbes in 2010, and 8 years later the accolade remains on point. It is not surprising that tourism generates over £750 million for the city’s economy. Read more…

Armed Angels

Have you heard of Armed Angels? The Cologne-based fashion brand was founded by Anton Jurina and Martin Höfeler in 2007, and is slowly by steadily redefining what effortless sustainability is really all about. The brand, which I discovered with a simple google search and less than 5 minutes of research, creates a comprehensive and beautiful range of clothes for men and women, what it truly means to be organic is centered as Armed Angel’s core offering. Ethical fashion as a culture and business fairness as a mainstay are thrown in for good measure. Forget fast fashion, the future is about fair fashion and Armed Angels do it so well.

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Pink NouNou the ethical baby toy brand…meet the delightful handmade extravangaza for little ones

The best way to describe Pink Nounou? Modern and playful designs for both kids and those young at heart! The gorgeous brand offers a range of textile and paper products designed for little ones but to be admired and appreciated by the kind of parents who appreciate practical and unique pieces. Pink Nounou’s cheery little softie characters in particular present a visual delight, ones easy to become attached to! There are also a ton of eco products to discover! Designer and CEO Ana Carriço creates one-of-a-kind dolls and soft toysbibs with fairy talesbaby rattles, pillows (mini or square), art prints and so much more. I caught up with Ana, the dynamic creative genius, to discuss some of the coolest toys in our play box and find out more about this exciting brand.

PLEASE INTRODUCE YOURSELF AND TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT YOUR BRAND?

My name is Ana, I’m 42 years old. I LOVE to draw and travel (although I’m really afraid of flying), also I love chocolate, ice-cream & my beautiful daughter (not necessarily in this order!).

I was born in Mozambique lived in Portugal since I was 4 years old. I am currently based in Lisboa with my 10 year old daughter and my husband. I always lived by the sea which is also something I love and feel very connected to! I have a degree in Graphic Design and in these past few years I’ve been fully dedicated to my brand – PinkNounou.

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